Week 04 – Lab Reflection + Reading Response

  1. Global Leaders: Orange and Blue Engagement (GLOBE) is an organization at the University of Illinois that encourages all international students to become better leaders that they have the potential to be. It’s designed as two groups: Blue members (experienced domestic and international students) and Orange members (new international students). The organization teams them up in small groups to participate with one another in certain activities and events. The sole purpose of GLOBE is to provide domestic and international students a chance to develop their networking skills to prepare them for life after college. It also gives them an opportunity to develop global awareness and learn the importance of cultural diversity. This program works well with the institutional system because there are many international students that attend the University. As related to socio-historical contexts, its function is to integrate international students to the school to address the needs of diversity and cultural competency.
  2. As outlined in the strategic plan of the University of Illinois, “the goal of GLOBE is to provide opportunities for domestic and international students to enhance intercultural communication skills.” The data on the percentage of international students was most likely used to implement this program. Many international students have aspirations to be a part of a prestigious institution, so this could have been a factor in creating a program that enhances these students coming from overseas.
  3. Research: To provide evidence for the needs that the program addresses, I need data that shows what kind of impact a program like this could actually make on international students that would like to further diversify their culture. Both documents demonstrate an international student’s experience with GLOBE and how they’ve established close relationships with friends that they never thought they would.

Document 1: https://dailyillini.com/features/2018/10/16/program-connects-international-and-domestic-students/

Document 2: https://drahcir62.wixsite.com/abelveraportafolio/copy-of-peruvian-sa-uiuc

3 Questions:

How has GLOBE changed your perspective on cultures displayed here vs. the ones that you are used to from your country?

What challenges do international or domestic students face that GLOBE is able to centralize?

Is this program an effective way of growing an international student’s social interaction and involvement?

3 Multiple Choice Questions:

Approximately what percentage of students at the University of Illinois are from another country?

  • 10%
  • 15%
  • 25%
  • 35%
  • 50%
  • 75%
  • 85%

Six semesters after the initiation of GLOBE, how many students apply to the program?

  • 100 to 200
  • 300 to 400
  • 400 to 500
  • 600 to 700
  • 800 to 1000
  • 1000+

How competitive is it to become a member of GLOBE?

  • Not competitive
  • A little competitive
  • 50-50
  • Competitive
  • Very Competitive
  • Extremely Competitive

A barrier this program faces is the number of Blue members, the ones with experience on campus, that they have. These members are sometimes overwhelmed by the number of Orange members, the incoming international students, that they have come into the program. This is what makes the program competitive to get into, but no one has opposed the idea of creating a better cultural diversity to the University of Illinois.

The program needs more Blue students because there are many incoming students that would love to be a part of it, and the Blue students have to accommodate the Orange students. I believe if students are introduced to the program as early as possible, it would immensely help the numbers in the Blue Group.

Reading Response

As diverse concerns spread across UIUC and other college campuses, there were many students and campus groups that used a strategy to display those concerns and make change. Many of these strategies had to overcome barriers, many of them being social and political. The Clabaugh Act was a factor that grew campus antiwar activities, a strategy that pressed for change. The president of the campus SDS “announced a Vietnam War ‘speak out’ to be held at a space identified as a ‘Free Speech Area’ off the quad” to practice these rights (Metz 45). The purpose of the speak out was to coincide with nationwide antiwar rallies, and a barrier that this group had to overcome was debating the student senate request for support in their call for the Clabaugh repeal.

Berkey, a student from California, also came up without a thoughtful strategy to create change from a political perspective. His political action began “with participation in a sit-in at the U.S Attorney’s office in San Fransisco, demanding federal protection for civil rights workers in the South” and used this as a strategy to create change (Metz 46). He eventually became a leader of the Illinois student movement, but a barrier he had to deal with was criticism after admitting that “he had actually missed the Free Speech Movement at Berkeley by a semester” (Metz 46).

Women used student-led uprisings as a strategy to provide them access to higher education. Although it came with barriers, “their presence in public, high politicized settings with a strongly egalitarian ethos opened up unprecedented possibilities for personal freedom” and gained status through male leaders (Evans 338). These women brought social and political messages to the public, which had a very positive effect on personal liberation for young women. Their challenge to patriarchy “broke the rules[…] Parents worried not only for their daughters’ safety but also their reputations,” as a result (Evans 338). As they redefined womanhood by partaking in roles that normally men would take, their expectations were set a lot higher as a barrier to their strategy.

5 Questions

  1. What student-led group in the 1960s proved to be the most effective? Why?
  2. Did your political standpoint change your perspective on these movements? How so?
  3. What student group at UIUC made the most impact on women’s rights?
  4. How much did Freedom of Speech play a factor in students willing to reform their campus in the 1960s?
  5. Although many women have jobs now that back then men would normally have, do women still deal with political barriers?

1 thought on “Week 04 – Lab Reflection + Reading Response”

  1. Speaking from personal experience, GLOBE is a great program! I do agree that a pain point of the program is the lack of awareness among and participation from domestic students — who are usually Blue students. As well as that, the experience of a student in GLOBE is largely dependent on their team and while teams are generally racially/gender diverse, they may not have a lot in common innately — thus making it more difficult for members to bond especially when suddenly in a group of six people that they are told to meet-up with once a week throughout the semester. The AACC and OIIR are generally underfunded and overstretched in my opinion so this is at no one’s fault in my opinion. As I shared earlier in class, my group and I tended to go to the weekly AACC/OIIR events that had free food. Also, it can be hard to coordinate large groups of people — in our case, 6 — in order to do events.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *